Newsletters

IRS Provides Reasons Why Some Tax Refunds Filed Electronically Take Longer than 21 Days, IR-2022-65

The IRS has informed taxpayers that the agency issues most refunds in less than 21 days for taxpayers who filed electronically and chose direct deposit. However, some refunds may take longer. The IRS listed several factors that can affect the timing of a refund after the agency receives a return. A manual review may be necessary when a return has errors, is incomplete or is affected by identity theft or fraud. Other returns can also take longer to process, including when a return needs a correction to the Child Tax Credit amount or includes a Form 8379, Injured Spouse Allocation, which could take up to 14 weeks to process. The fastest way to get a tax refund is by filing electronically and choosing direct deposit. Taxpayers who don’t have a bank account can find out more on how to open an account at an FDIC-Insured bank or the National Credit Union Locator Tool.

Further, the IRS cautioned taxpayers not to rely on receiving a refund by a certain date, especially when making major purchases or paying bills. Taxpayers should also take into consideration the time it takes for a financial institution to post the refund to an account or to receive it by mail. Before filing, taxpayers should make IRS.gov their first stop to find online tools to help get the information they need to file. To check the status of a refund, taxpayers should use the Where’s My Refund? tool on IRS.gov. The IRS will contact taxpayers by mail when more information is needed to process a return. IRS representatives can only research the status of a refund if it has been: 21 days or more since it was filed electronically; six weeks or more since a return was mailed; or when the Where’s My Refund? tool tells the taxpayer to contact the IRS.

Additionally, taxpayers whose tax returns from 2020 have not yet been processed should still file their 2021 tax returns by the April due date or request an extension to file. Those filing electronically in this group need their Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) from their most recent tax return. Those waiting on their 2020 tax return to be processed should enter zero dollars for last year’s AGI on the 2021 tax return. When self-preparing a tax return and filing electronically, taxpayers must sign and validate the electronic tax return by entering their prior-year AGI or prior-year Self-Select PIN (SSP). Those who electronically filed last year may have created a five-digit SSP. Generally, tax software automatically enters the information for returning customers. Taxpayers who are using a software product for the first time may have to enter this information.

Rates Used in Computing Special Use Value Issued, Rev. Rul. 2022-16

A listing of the average annual effective interest rates on new loans under the Farm Credit System has been issued […]

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Rates Used in Computing Special Use Value Issued, Rev. Rul. 2022-16

IRS Unintentionally Releases Form 990-T Data

The Internal Revenue Service announced that it has unintentionally made certain data collected from Form 990-T available for bulk download […]

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IRS Unintentionally Releases Form 990-T Data

IRS Clarifies Instructions for Form 8996, IRS Post-Release Changes to Tax Forms, Instructions, and Publications

The IRS has clarified that qualified opportunity zone businesses should not file Form 8996. Form 8996 is filed only by […]

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IRS Clarifies Instructions for Form 8996, IRS Post-Release Changes to Tax Forms, Instructions, and Publications

List of Countries with U.S. Exchange of Information Agreements Updated, Rev. Proc. 2022-35

The IRS has supplemented the list of countries with which the U.S. has an agreement relating to the exchange of […]

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List of Countries with U.S. Exchange of Information Agreements Updated, Rev. Proc. 2022-35

Tuition Debt Relief Will Not Be Taxable Income

The recently announced tuition debt relief program will not add to the tax burden of individuals who are able to […]

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Tuition Debt Relief Will Not Be Taxable Income

IRS Advises Tax Professionals on Signs of Identity Theft, IR-2022-144

The IRS and Security Summit partners have urged tax professionals to be vigilant and look out for the signs of […]

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IRS Advises Tax Professionals on Signs of Identity Theft, IR-2022-144

IRS Issues Statement on CP-14 Notices

The IRS was aware that some payments made for 2021 tax returns were incorrectly applied to joint taxpayer accounts. These […]

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IRS Issues Statement on CP-14 Notices

IRS Updates Premium Tax Credit Table, Required Contribution Percentage, Rev. Proc. 2022-34

The IRS has updated the applicable percentage table used to calculate an individual’s premium tax credit and required contribution percentage […]

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IRS Updates Premium Tax Credit Table, Required Contribution Percentage, Rev. Proc. 2022-34

Reproduction/Substitute Information Returns Requirements Issued, Rev. Proc. 2022-30

The IRS has provided the specifications for the private printing of red-ink substitutes for the 2022 revisions of information returns, […]

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Reproduction/Substitute Information Returns Requirements Issued, Rev. Proc. 2022-30

IRS and Treasury Release Initial Information on Electric Vehicle Tax Credit Under Inflation Reduction Act

The Treasury Department and the IRS have published initial information on changes to the tax credit for electric vehicles strengthened […]

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IRS and Treasury Release Initial Information on Electric Vehicle Tax Credit Under Inflation Reduction Act